Microsoft OS Licensing – Types and Tips

Microsoft OS Licensing – Types and Tips

OCM, Retail, and Volume licenses get demystified here…

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Changing the Rules on Passwords

Changing the Rules on Passwords

To change regularly, or not to change? The age-old question is having its rules redefined by the FTC.

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Free Antivirus: Friend, or Foe?

Free Antivirus: Friend, or Foe?

Free antivirus software can seem like a great idea, but the benefits don’t outweigh the risks.

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January’s Letter from the Editor: IT Fails in the New Year

January’s Letter from the Editor: IT Fails in the New Year

The New Year is here, and for most of us, our brains are still frazzled from the craziness that is the holidays. A lot goes on in the beginning of a new year—new employees, new policies, new numbers, etc. Many of us will find ourselves making more mistakes than we’d like to admit during this time of the year. But have no fear, we are not alone. Take a look at the following list of IT fails—people who are just as confused with the New Year as we are. No Windows:               Type 11:             Free Wi-Fi:                           The Proper Use of White-Out:                 Are you liquid-brained during the transition back to work in the New Year? If so, give us a call, and we can get you right back on track! Whether it’s facilitating proper backups, fixing printer issues, or bringing back crashed servers, MTI is here to help you fix all of your New Year woes and keep your network up and running better than ever. We look forward to serving you and all of your IT demands this year, and hope you will keep us in mind when you run into any “technical difficulties”. “Think? Why think! We have computers to do that for us.” –Jean Rostand...

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9 Ways You Are Absentmindedly Threatening Your Network’s Security

9 Ways You Are Absentmindedly Threatening Your Network’s Security

There are potential threats to your system every minute of every day. Because of all of the malicious malware and virus threats, it is important to take preventative measures to ensure your network has the best possible security for your system. But even with preventative action, we still put our system at risk by simple, common mistakes. Here’s a list of nine things we do (sometimes without even knowing) that can threaten our systems: 1. Don’t Forget to Lock Up! Even if certain areas of your network are encrypted, it does no good if you leave your computer unlocked. Maybe you’re just running to the bathroom, or stepping up to grab your coffee while doing some work at Starbucks, or just jumping up to answer the door—either way, you must always remember to lock your computer. We lock our doors when we leave home to keep potential threats away—treat your computer the same way. 2. Information Hoarding One common mistake we’re probably all guilty of is letting our USB devices get too cluttered. We tend to utilize USB sticks for storing important documents, but most of us can’t remember to move these files. After transporting information via USB, don’t forget to store it, or delete it off of the USB once you are finished. USB sticks are easily lost, shared, and/or stolen. If the USB finds its way to the wrong hands, sensitive information will be at risk. 3. Keep Your Mouth (or Keyboard) Shut! It’s hard to admit, but a lot of us can tend to be blabbermouths when it comes to social media. Posting sensitive details about your job can be extremely unsafe on social media. Even describing your roles, responsibilities, or job title can be dangerous. If you mention that you are an administrative assistant to the CEO at your company, for example, you may be targeted by hackers that assume you have a lot of sensitive, confidential information on your computer. 4. Stay in the Loop—Update! We’ve all done it—we see a notification that pops up in the middle of our work telling us to update our computer or device in use. We choose the “ignore” option, forget about it, and move on about our day. But what we can tell you here at MTI is that updates are important. Updates keep your system resistant to attacks. Many vendors (like Microsoft) will issue patches to update systems because they see security vulnerabilities. Because of this, employees may be at increased risks for attacks if updates aren’t applied within a timely matter. 5. Cybercriminals Use Phones Too… In business, it is inevitable that the phone will ring multiple times throughout the day. Phishers are starting to use phones to find vulnerability in a system’s security. Data thieves can call your main line and speak with employees to extract private information, such as account numbers or social security numbers. Phishers may also call your phone claiming to call from IT helpdesks or tech support, and will ask for your username and password. Never give this information unless you completely trust the source from which the call came. Don’t give out this information to anyone other than your trusted IT company. You should also be wary of scammers directing you to go to certain websites to download anything...

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Mobile Malware: A Real Threat

Mobile Malware: A Real Threat

Did you know that your mobile devices can be affected by viruses and malware? In fact, there are many different software applications that are aimed towards mobile devices. This type of threat to your mobile devices is known as “mobile malware”. Two thirds of smartphone owners don’t even realize their devices can be infected by this malware. Most mobile device users keep their entire lives buried in and under the apps stored on their phones. With the innovative world of mobile technology, we can store essentially everything on our mobile devices. With apps like Apple Pay, the PayPal app, banking apps, and even simple notepad apps, we can store all types of information—even vulnerable information, such as bank account passwords and other private information. Cybercriminals see mobile devices as the perfect opportunity to obtain confidential information, such as addresses, phone numbers, passwords, and banking information. Mobile malware is a real threat to our mobile devices. It is able to engage in plenty of detrimental acts without the user’s permission, such as text messaging a premium rate number, sending contacts unwanted information, and many other malicious attacks. Mobile devices are also susceptible to spyware, which can be used to capture information that are of interest to third parties, such as contact lists, phone logs, texts, location, and browser history. Some cybercriminals practicing in malware generation have also developed apps that secretly record telephone conversations and even intercept texts used to authenticate user identity in online banking and other payment apps. Most of the time, malware is hidden in popular, legitimate apps normally found in the app stores of mobile phones. This way to spread malware is more commonly seen in Android app stores, but it has been seen in iPhones, as well. Our technicians are very handy when it comes to attacking malware and virus threats. If you think you may be at risk, or have already been affected, feel free to call our office and let us help you...

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