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There are many kinds of attacks on computers, some targeted at operating systems, some at networks, and some at both. This section is a basic introduction to the types of attacks, not an attempt to describe all known attacks. Some typical attacks include: Standalone workstation or server attacks. Attacks enabled by access to passwords, and Viruses, worms, and Trojan horses. Are you protected? Below are more types of attacks.

– Buffer attacks                                -Port scanning

– Denial of service                           -Wireless attacks

– Source routing attacks                 -E-mail attacks

– Spoofing



Are you prepared?  Your technical assets are important. Below is the first attack on your valuables that you should be prepared for in your organization

Standalone Workstation or Server Attacks

One of the simplest ways to attack an operating system is to take advantage of someone’s logged-on computer when that person is not present. Some computer users do not log off when they go away from their desks, or do not configure a screen saver with a password. Many operating systems enable you to configure a screen saver that starts after a specified time of inactivity. The screen saver can be set up to require the user to enter a password before resuming operations.

A workstation or server left unprotected in this way is an easy target when no one is around. For example, in some organizations all of the members of a particular unit go on coffee break together, leaving their area unattended. In this situation, a logged-on computer is an invitation to an intruder. Sometimes even servers are targets, because a server administrator or operator may step away, leaving an account with administrator permissions logged on for anyone to use. Even if a server is in a locked computer operations room, the server may become a target of anyone who has access to that room, including programmers, managers, electricians, maintenance people, and others. How long do your computers stay unlocked when a user steps away from their computer? Are you protected from the Standalone Attack?